Archive for the ‘yarn’ Category

Think of it as a work in progress. This is the first time I tried this technique and the result is not perfect, but at least it looks like it’ll work with a few changes.

The idea was to make a partially felted bracelet by combining a beautiful hand-spun wool yarn with an eyelash yarn in similar colors.

The surface of the bracelet would be decorated with “beads” of plain wool on top. I knit a bracelet-size piece, about 8″ long and 2″ wide, and then stitched little mounds of the wool yarn on top and did the felting thing.

The problem is I didn’t make the wool beads big enough, so I added more yarn for the next trip through the washing machine and the new yarn didn’t mesh well with the original beads. The end result isn’t bad — okay, it is pretty awful! — but it’ll be a lot better next time!

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One thing I love about creating new clothes from older pieces is that you never really know how they’ll turn out until they’re done. At least that’s been my experience. And here we have Exhibit A: a great little denim jacket that I appliqued with vintage denim, adding a flower and two leaves.

Kind of sad looking — not at all what I was hoping for. But that just meant it needed more work, right? The floppiness of the flower petals was fixed by stitching them into place, but it was still missing something. And then this arrived …

Yes, hand-spun art yarn from one of my major etsy faves, FromMyArtToYours. Pictures don’t do this yarn justice — it’s soft as a cloud and such a dreamy color. Originally, it was going to go on a pale blue camisole, but as soon as it arrived, it was obvious that it was destined for that denim jacket. Are these the perfect couple, or what?

Adding yarn vastly improved the little flower, too.

There’s a little more yarn on the front:

Plus, there’s enough left over to make something else. Or not. When yarn is this pretty, I just want to keep it in a bowl by my desk to look at. In this case, “art yarn” is an absolutely accurate description!

I couldn’t resist adding a bright blue “love monkey” applique to this green hoodie.

Next, it’s going to get outlined with this gorgeous blue/green yarn.

The yarn, from mymixmix, came already felted, so the hoodie can be washed without any problems. Brilliant!

You can do so many things with it, in addition to knitting, of course. For example, I was  working on a new camisole and really  wanted something to complement the pale green and orange color scheme. So I searched the etsy listings for green and orange yarn and found “Mr. McGregor’s Garden” by frommyartoyours.

Perfection! Just the right colors, plus I loved the fact that it’s so animal friendly and uses faux cashmere, something I’d never heard of.  It arrived a few days later and was even better than I expected — very soft and lush, perfect for embellishing lingerie. So here’s the work in progress, with various elements still needing to be attached.

The yarn trim isn’t knitted, it’s sewn on and beaded, so it looks almost like a necklace.

Finally, just for fun, I made a funky little bracelet with the same yarn.


All this and there’s still lots more yarn to work with! Thank you, frommyarttoyours!!!


Until the economy perks up, most everyone is cutting back on expenses wherever possible. But pity us poor crafters — forced to deny ourselves the indulgences in fabric, yarn and other delights that make what we do possible!

Naturally, I was rescued from my pity party by another crafter — the wonderful Sandy Wiseheart at Knitting Daily. As she points out in her latest post, it’s possible to indulge without guilt by simply scaling back — that is, buying just one skein of awesome yarn at a time. (I know — the thought of one skein makes me shudder, too — but desperate times and all that!)

Not only does your one skein purchase help the local yarn store stay in business, but it can also be made into something very cool — especially if you have a copy of Leigh Radford’s book, One Skein.

Another idea: I’ve read about groups of crafters who live in the same area getting together and trading items from their stash, which sounds like so much fun!

Finally, if you’ve never unraveled a sweater to recycle the yarn, what are you waiting for???? Here’s a great tutorial. Seriously, thrift stores sell wonderful, barely used sweaters for just a few bucks. And you can get a whole lot of perfectly good yarn from one sweater. Not to mention the fact that the unraveling process is great mindless fun … and who couldn’t use some of that these days?